News
Boston College Students Seek to "Do More" on Jamaica Magis Service Trips

Feb. 2, 2017 - In 2012, Boston College undergraduate students Matthew Nacier, Marsha Guillaume and Patrick Williamson and Boston College campus minister Fr. Michael Davidson, SJ, founded the Jamaica Magis Service Trip as a way to serve the needs of the Jamaican people and as a way for students to learn more about their vibrant culture.

Organized through Boston College’s office of campus ministry, Jamaica Magis aims to provide students an opportunity to live and serve in solidarity with the people in Kingston, Jamaica, who have faced social, political, and economic oppression. The founders envisioned a trip where a diverse group of students could come together and learn and grow as a family through service, regardless of skin color. 

“Students join the Jamaica Magis Service Trip because they are looking for the magis, an Ignatian call to “do more,” said Fr. Davidson, a Jamaica native and member of the USA Northeast Province. “All participants are searching for a life with deeper meaning, a deeper connection with God, and a chance to live out a faith that does justice.” 


Equipped with a semester of education about Jamaican culture, history and current events, Jamaica Magis students arrive in Kingston with a deeper understanding of the people and the context in which they live. The length of the trip has been steadily extending, and now runs for 13 days in winter, spring break and in the summer. Additionally, the number of participants increases each year, with 25 for the winter of 2017. In total, over 200 students have participated in the 5 years that the trip has been active. 

The majority of the trip is dedicated to teaching at the Holy Family Primary School in downtown Kingston, an inner-city school that educates over 1,000 students who are in dire need of materials. Students also visit multiple charities, such as Mustard Seed Communities and Missionaries of Charities, which serve different marginalized populations. 

“During their time in Jamaica, students gain a deeper understanding of social justice and spirituality by learning to recognize the face of God in all things,” said Fr. Davidson. “This could be in the hug of a child they serve at an impoverished primary school, in the smile of an elderly woman whose memory is failing, in the strength of the community, and in themselves.” 





Recent News

July 14, 2017 - Free, online access to numerous scholarly publications and sources in the Jesuit Studies field is now available, thanks to a project of the Boston College Institute for Advanced Jesuit Studies. The Portal to Jesuit Studies is meant to serve as a "Jesuit Google," strengthening the institute's efforts to serve as a resource on the history, spirituality, and pedagogy of the Society of Jesus.

July 13, 2017 - Xavier Mission - a New York City based organization that provides basic services as well as opportunities for empowerment and self-sufficiency to those in need - will hold a fundraising benefit on Tues., July 25.

July 13, 2017 - July 14 is the feast of St. Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint in the Catholic Church who converted to Christianity after being inspired by Jesuit missionaries in what is now upstate New York.

July 11, 2017 — Only 13 of 49 complaints received responses.

July 7, 2017 — The Campaign for Hospitality aims to build a greater culture of welcoming and compassion for those who migrate to the U.S. and Canada.

July 5, 2017 -- JESUITS Magazine, the magazine of the Maryland and USA Northeast Provinces won a 2017 Catholic Press Association (CPA) award (Second place) in the Best Religious Order Magazine category.

July 5, 2017 — The new province came into existence July 1 and will serve 10 Western states.

view all news

Search news







Eastern Point Retreat House
Eastern Point Retreat House, a grand house located on the Atlantic shore in Gloucester, Mass., has been welcoming retreatants since 1958.